Windstar Cruise

10 days - Dutch Treats Steel Drum Beats [St. Maarten to Colón]

10 days - Dutch Treats Steel Drum Beats [St. Maarten to Colón]
Starting from $1,799*

St. Maarten to Colón

Ship: Wind Star

Departure Date : Nov 18 2020

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

Itinerary

Day Philipsburg, Sint Maarten
Arrives 06:00 AM
"This Leeward island has been famously bisected into French and Dutch territories since 1648, and is referred to both as Saint Martin and Sint Maarten. In their respective capitals—Marigot and Philipsburg—there are ancient stone forts and candy-colored buildings lining winding streets. The Dutch side has a slightly larger population but is a bit smaller, at 34 square kilometers (13 square miles), versus the 53-square-kilometer (20-square-mile) Saint Martin. Named for its founder John Philips, Philipsburg, the capital of the Dutch side, has some excellent international art galleries, thumping discos and popular casinos. Farther afield are beautiful beaches and a seemingly endless array of nature conservancies. With them come extensive opportunities for adventure—hiking, biking and zip lining—and amazing wildlife sightings in the sea, on land and in the sky."
Philipsburg, Sint Maarten
Day Virgin Gorda, Prickly Pear Beach, B.V.I
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 05:00 PM
A beautiful coral reef wavers just beneath you as your ship makes the break into exclusive North Sound. You can imagine the reaction of the locals watching from The Bitter End Yacht Club as your ship comes around the corner under full canvas. At the other end of the island lies the curious assembly of house-sized boulders called “The Baths,” which form huge underground pools and caverns that you’re free to explore.
Virgin Gorda, Prickly Pear Beach, B.V.I
Day At Sea

Day At Sea

Day Kralendijk, Bonaire
Arrives 09:00 AM Departs 10:00 PM
Almost as soon as you pull into the port of Kralendijk, you’ll realize it’s one of the most laid-back landings around. Though there are some colorful streets to stroll nearby—remnants (mostly) of Bonaire’s Dutch-colonial era—even the busiest lack the bustle of other Caribbean capitals. Which is a good thing. The comparative sleepiness helps maintain the island’s chief attributes: legendarily pristine wilderness, both above and below the surface; mangroves full of baby fish; and salt flats full of flamingos. And reefs full of . . . everything. Nature’s cup overfloweth here. And, by the way, so will yours (have the cactus liqueur even if you try no other local beverage). There’s also an embarrassment of cultural riches, thanks to the layers of Amerindian, Spanish, African, Dutch and British influences on the island. In fact, you’ll hear traces of the languages of all of the above (plus some French and Portuguese) during any given conversation in Papiamento, the creole language spoken throughout the Netherlands Antilles. You'll find you can get by just fine with a few key phrases: por fabor, danki and bon dia—all of which mean exactly what you think they do.
Kralendijk, Bonaire
Day Willemstad, Curacao
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
"The capital of Curaçao, Willemstad, is almost as old as a more famous Dutch settlement—it was founded in 1634, just 10 years after New Amsterdam, later called New York. But while the Dutch control of New Amsterdam was relatively brief, Curaçao remains a part of the Netherlands to this day. Its historic center is a unique mixture of Dutch architecture and Caribbean pastels, its gabled row houses overlooking Sint Anna Bay, a waterway dividing the city in two and connecting the Caribbean to the protected Schottegat Bay. The entire historic center of Willemstad has been recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. While Willemstad's legendary days of yore can be explored at institutions like the Kura Hulanda and Curaçao Maritime Museum, this is a vibrant, living city too. Highlights of this multicultural melting pot might include a stop at its floating market and a visit to a curaçao distillery to taste the famous local liqueur. Natural wonders await as well: Some of the Caribbean’s most stunning diving and snorkeling spots are here. Finally, a meal in Willemstad will let you experience the diversity of the island through the surprising flavors of its cuisine, which reflects European, Caribbean and Latin American influences. "
Willemstad, Curacao
Day Oranjestad, Aruba
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 04:00 PM
"Located off the coast of Venezuela, the windswept Dutch island of Aruba is otherworldly. Here, the beaches are spectacularly pristine, the waters are romantically restless, the island interior is lunar-like and filled with cacti, and the trees are—quite famously—bent in the wind. The island's consistent trade winds are part of the destination's allure: They keep the humidity, rain and hurricanes common in much of the Caribbean during its off-season at bay. The main port and capital city, Oranjestad, is a maze of Dutch-colonial architecture painted in a palette of Caribbean pastels. There are some historic sites of note and myriad shops, from boutiques to megastores, selling all sorts of keepsakes, with jewelry and gold being popular items—in fact, gold was mined here in the 19th century. In Oranjestad and along the beaches you'll also find a treasure trove of excellent seafood restaurants, while farther afield are lighthouses, gold mine ruins and natural wonders that reflect the rugged appeal of Aruba. "
Oranjestad, Aruba
Day At Sea

Day Cartagena, Colombia
Arrives 09:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
The Spanish founded Cartagena, officially known as Cartagena de Indias, in 1533. The city rapidly became a thriving commercial port, where precious stones and minerals from the New World awaited shipment back to Spain. Situated in a bay on the Caribbean Sea, Cartagena had the most extensive fortifications in South America, once guarded by 29 stone forts and a high wall of coral-stone measuring 16-miles long, 40-feet high and 50-feet wide. Completed in 1657, the Castle of San Felipe de Barajas is said to be the most grandiose work of military architecture erected by Spain in the Americas. Today, Cartagena's riches are found in the Boca Grande, an area of the city with beautiful waterfront hotels, trendy restaurants, casinos and boutiques.
Cartagena, Colombia
Day At Sea

Day Colon, Panama
Arrives 07:00 AM
The town was built as the Caribbean terminus of the Panama Railway and is adjacent to the Caribbean end of the Canal. A trip through the coastal rain forest to the old Spanish fortress of San Lorenzo gives great views of wildlife along the way and the seacoast at the end. Visitors often tour to the Miraflores or Gatun Locks of the canal from here. The Chagres National Park offers visits to the indigenous Embera people, and nearby Portobelo is a UNESCO World Heritage Site whose church holds an unusual statue of Christ depicted as a black man.
Colon, Panama
 
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